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What Illinois considers when awarding parental responsibilities

On Behalf of | Jan 11, 2022 | Child Custody |

When you and your child’s other parent split up in Illinois and you both want your child living in your home at least some of the time, you may need the state’s family court system to allocate parental responsibilities on your behalf. There are many different areas that undergo consideration when the courts do so. However, the primary goal is to come up with a living arrangement that best serves your child’s needs.

According to the Illinois General Assembly, the following are some of the many areas that undergo review when Illinois courts must divide parenting time.

Each parent’s desires

If both you and your ex desire to have parenting time with your shared child and you are both fit to parent, the court system may decide to have you share parenting time for the benefit of your child.

Your child’s desires

Depending on the age of your son or daughter and how mature he or she is, the courts may also take your child’s preferences into account when allocating parenting time and parental responsibilities.

Past parenting history

Courts also consider how much time and attention each of you devoted to raising your shared child for the 24 months preceding your case. If your child is younger than 2, courts typically review how much time each of you devoted to raising the child to date.

Your child’s existing lifestyle

Courts may also consider your child’s current routine with regard to education, his or her home and the surrounding community when making decisions about where the child should live and when.

All the areas mentioned above may carry weight in a custody case. However, many other areas may also undergo review before a court makes a final decision.