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Is it a good idea to have court-monitored communication?

| Oct 3, 2019 | Divorce |

One of the great things about technology is how it can change the way people interact and communicate. In the court system, this can also include requiring parents to talk with one another through court-monitored exchanges.

You might be worried about harassing calls or texts from your ex-spouse right now, but if you have monitored communication, that could put your anxiety to rest.

What is court-monitored communication?

Court-monitored communication is simply a method of communicating with another party where a third party, in this case, a court, can see what you are saying to one another. Today, an app might be used by the court and be a required method for communication between parents involved in a custody dispute, for example.

Apps like that are good for a few reasons. Some will report back the text exchanges you have, so you both stay on your best behavior. If not, then negative interactions will be plain to see. Some apps show where you are at the time of texts, which could help if there are concerns of stalking or harassment.

With time stamps and this evidence available to the court, each of you and your attorneys, it is much harder to hide disputes. In a lot of cases, having a monitored system of communication reduces the likelihood of conflict since it could negatively affect a person’s custody or visitation rights in the future.

If you believe that this kind of monitored communication could help your case, reach out to your attorney. They can discuss if this is an option for you locally.