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Don’t let negativity and conflict hurt your child

| Oct 15, 2019 | Child Custody |

When it comes to child custody, it’s important that both parents reach an agreement. When parents don’t get along or have a lot of animosity between them, even something as simple as exchanging custody can become frustrating and argumentative.

As a parent who is looking out for the best interests of your child, it’s important that you do all you can to reduce conflicts between you and your ex-spouse. Why? Negativity and conflicts have a detrimental effect on children.

How do kids react to parents’ conflicts?

To start with, negativity and conflict are harmful to a child’s ability to communicate. If you are constantly negative when they bring up the other parent, for example, your child may stop speaking with you about the other parent. On the other hand, your negativity could also cause them to rebel against you or the other parent, which could become a major source of conflict when transferring custody.

Conflicts can cause other problems, too. A child who is caught in the middle of parents who argue and fight may believe that they are to blame for their parents’ arguments and unhappiness. They may also believe that one parent is bad or “evil” as a result of constant fighting and the impact it has on their lives.

Negativity has a significant impact on your child’s ability to navigate life. Your child may become pessimistic and critical. They may also expect the worst in every situation, which is something that can cause stress and anxiety.

In the end, it is your responsibility to keep conflict and negativity away from your child. Being respectful of the other parent and trying to have a conflict-free relationship (at least when your child is present) is the key to helping your child adjust.